Start64!Apple started requiring new iOS apps to include 64-bit binaries back in iOS 8, but developers with 32-bit apps already in the App Store were allowed to stay. The writing was on the wall, however, and Apple since then has pushed for its entire ecosystem to go 64-bit, culminating with an announcement earlier this year that all apps, legacy or not, must move to 64-bit for iOS 11.

Start64!Have you ever wondered why you have the 32-bit version of Windows 10 installed on your computer while you have all the requirements to install the new version? Maybe you even need to upgrade from the 32-bit to the 64-bit version of Windows since some of your memory is not used (the 32-bit version only supports up to 4Gb of RAM). Before you upgrade, you need to check some things out first.

Start64!There are a lot of ways to count, but when it comes to computers there is only binary: 0 and 1. Each one is a considered a "bit." That means for 1-bit computing, you get two possible values; 2-bit means four values; then at 3 bits you double that to eight (2 to the third power, aka 2 cubed).

Start64!I have to admit this isn’t something I’ve thought about in a long time, but I peeked around and lo and behold Microsoft’s latest OS—Windows 10—is being offered in a 32-bit version. Microsoft says it has at least 71 million 32-bit users still (as of 2014), and didn’t want to leave them out in the cold, or thrust them into the open arms of Cupertino (headquarters of rival Apple). Given this situation, I figured I’d explain the main difference between the two.

Start64!Using Chrome on Windows? There’s a good chance you’re still using the 32-bit version. You should upgrade to the 64-bit version. It’s more secure–not to mention faster and more stable.

Start64!I’ve been reading some of the commentary on my post about 64-bit Visual Studio which is really about 64-bit vs. 32-bit generally using Visual Studio as an example and I have to say that for the most part, I’m pretty disappointed with the arguments being put forth in favor of 64-bits.

Start64!Most computers today ship with a 64-bit version of Windows, and often a minimal amount of RAM. This brings into question how well these systems perform. This is especially true when users want to run their legacy 32-bit software on these new computers. This is especially true when users want to run their legacy 32-bit software on these new computers.

Start64!Assuming you have the hardware to support it, you are able to switch from 32-bit version of Windows 10 to the 64-bit version of Windows 10. Naturally when you are upgrading from Windows 7 or Windows 8 to Windows 10, Microsoft will automatically give you the same version.

Start64!All of your computer’s hardware components work hand-in-hand to make everything run smoothly. However, the CPU’s architecture has the most saying in what you can install on a computer, including Windows itself.

Start64!Microsoft gives you the 32-bit version of Windows 10 if you upgrade from the 32-bit version of Windows 7 or 8.1. But you can switch to the 64-bit version, assuming your hardware supports it. If you had a 32-bit versions of Windows 7 or 8.1 installed on your PC and upgraded to Windows 10, Microsoft gave you the 32-bit version of Windows 10.

Start64!You can only upgrade to Windows 10 using the same architecture -- for example, from Windows 7 32-bit to Windows 10 32-bit. In other words, you cannot do an in-place upgrade from 32-bit Windows to 64-bit Windows and maintain all your installed programs, plus a Windows 10 license.

Start64!In my previous post I talked about recursion problems in a Fibonacci function using 64-bit variables as function parameters, compiled using the Microsoft Visual C++ compiler. It turned out that while tail recursion was enabled by the compiler using 32-bit types it didn't really when switching to 64-bit ones.

Start64!I want to share with you a problem I run into comparing iterative and recursive functions in C++. There are several differences between recursion and iteration, this article explains the topic nicely if you want to know more. In general languages like Java, C, and Python, recursion is fairly expensive compared to iteration because it requires the allocation of a new stack frame.

Start64!A major driver of modern C/C++ development is the need for producing native 64-bit code. In most cases, servers and desktop systems are now almost exclusively 64-bit machines. Given this fact, isn't the move to 64-bit C/C++ code just a matter of changing a few build settings? Stephen B. Morris explains why it's not so simple.

Start64!A few days ago, Gabriel Aul, head of the Windows Insider Program, confirmed in a short tweet that Windows 10 would also launch with a 32-bit SKU, thus putting an end to some weird rumors pointing out that Microsoft wants to step away from this architecture type with the new OS version.

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